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20121101
20121130
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LINKTV 46
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English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Nov 27, 2012 11:00am PST
, sad for america: he never returned to his home. at 34, john singleton copley was already one of the best and most popular painters in the american colonies. the young american artist john trumbull said of him, "an elegant-looking man dressed in fine maroon cloth with gold buttons, this dazzling to my unpracticed eye, but his painting, the first i'd ever seen deserving the name, riveted--absorbed my attention and renewed my desires to enter upon such a pursuit." copley had more work than he could do. early in his career, he mastered the popular rococo style: rich texture of laces and lush fabrics, empty faces. but like many pre-revolutionary americans, copley could not suppress his belief in individual and personal expression. ( drumbeats ) taxation without representation: copley's father-in-law, an english merchant, was importing tea to america. copley felt he could not speak out against his family, nor could he defend them. seeking his artistic heritage, he sailed for europe. it wasn't long before he became part of that heritage, a forerunner in the great romantic movement.
LINKTV
Nov 15, 2012 11:30am PST
annenberg media ♪ captioning sponsored by annenberg/cpb narrator: north america is comprised of canada and the united states. these two highly-aanced and comparatively wealthy cotries are home to an extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now
LINKTV
Nov 8, 2012 11:30am PST
annenberg media ♪ narrator: the region called latin america can be divided up into several subregions, including four in south america. in the northern andes subregion, ecuador is the smallest country, but one of its most dynamic, at least geologically. the physical geography of ecuador is dominated by the volcanoes and other mountains that are raised up as the tectonic plate beneath the pacific ocean slowly but violently collides with south america. around the world, humans have learned to survive such natural hazards, but sometimes they cannot escape tragedy. in this story, we follow a geographer working at many levels to help people live with a killer volcano. narrator: of the 200 volcanoes in ecuador, 30 could erupt again. guagua pichincha has devastated quito, the capital, several times, so scientists monitor emissions of sulfur gas with gatonrn. in 1985, a massive eruption in neighboring colombia melted snowfields, causing mudflows that killed more than 23,000 people. throughout south america, scientists study the tragedy and vow to prevent the next one. they may get
LINKTV
Nov 27, 2012 11:30am PST
, before passage by ship to her home in america. royo follows "femme" to washington, d.c., to supervise the installation on the south wall of the east building's central court. there are now many new problems to overcome. the tolerances are extremely close, demanding precise measurement, careful planning and a team effort. the huge roll barely fits into this confined space. the workers must unroll it evenly and accurately. bolts have been embedded deep into the structural wall, behind the marble facing, to support this massive piece when it slides into place. ( muffled comments ) carefully, royo grooms "femme," as the crew gradually hoistser upwd over the last few yards of a long journey. ( music ) this is the realization of many dreams, uly a work of collaboration; the fulfillment of a vision shared by the architect and the national gallery, supported by generous patrs, brought to fruition by joan miro and josep royo. on this day, those drms and efforts are reaching a successf conusion. "femme" is at home. brown: "it's everything we hoped." today, suspended 42 feet above the museum flo
LINKTV
Nov 1, 2012 7:30pm PDT
said we have to find our life right here in america. he said that everything we need, we can have it right here in america. so he changed his direction for us, he changed his vision for the future. >> you know, i wanted to run this by you. i don't know if you had a chance- the way i've spoken about it, and we had some notes here, is when we speak about religion, we talk about two very fundamental things, and one is identity- you know, who you are- and one is your relationship with god or with other people. and to try to make sense of elijah muhammad's teaching of nation of islam, i've talked about it in terms of identity being self-esteem and relationship as being empowerment, and that's what african-americans needed because of being marginalized, being pushed aside. does that make any sense? >> well, it comes home very clearly to me. >> yeah. i'm saved! >> yeah, that's what it was all about. it was all about getting us to feel better about ourselves, putting more value on ourselves as human beings in the human family, and finding new relationships with the blacks as muslims. now,
LINKTV
Nov 23, 2012 8:00am PST
is kate smith singing irving berlin's "god bless america." and that'sthat was the big hit of the year. and woody hated that song. kate smith: [singing] god bless america some interesting songs, because as he was hitchhiking north and eastland that i love. stand beside her, and guide her through the night with a light from above. will kaufman: now, i mean, there's two ways you can look at that song. you can look at "god bless america," written by irving berlin, all rightit's the fearful prayer, almost, of a european jewish immigrant to the united states who's nervously watching the rise of fascism in europe and praying that it won't happen over here. he actually wrote it back in 1917 and put it away. but, you know, looking at hitler across the sea, he's maybe thinking it's time for that song to be resurrected. so that's a charitable way of looking at it. it's not bombastic, it's not patriotic; it's fearful, and it's hopeful. that's not the way woody saw it. woody saw it as a strident, jingoistic, complacent, tub- thumping anthem to american greatness. and now, he had just come from the
LINKTV
Nov 15, 2012 7:30am PST
nurtured this country's growth and development. "gold on the streets of america." that's all you heard. you could be anything you want here and make a lot of money. even a dollar a day. e more i see of my adopted country, the more gratitude do i feel toward it for affording me protection... from the tyrants of my native country. [ narrator ] at first, the door to the united states was open to anyone... who could survive the dangers of travel to this young, distant land. that hope to be in america was so great and so sunny, that it colored all the pain that we had during our trip. the first night in america... i spent with hundreds of other recently arrived immigrants in an immense hall... with tiers of narrow iron and canvas bunks. [ narrator ] today, entry to the united states is more carefully controlled. but the stories of the immigrants echo the stories of earlier settlers. i knew that if i came here i would have... the freedom and the independence to go out and do things, that maybe at the time i was growing up in india i would have been limited. not havi
LINKTV
Nov 1, 2012 9:00am PDT
of hollywood and beyond, new filmmakers are making some of the most interesting films in america today, films that have made hollywood stand up and watch. these filmmakers work against great od on shoestring budgets. if they succeeed, they can get a chance to make hollywood pictures, like quentin tarantino and "pulp fiction." but going hollywood has its price, one that some ofhese filmmakers won't pay. this program, narrated by frances mcdormand, we will look at some visions from "the edge." aaahh! (big band music playing) independent films are the most important there are in the usa. they're the lifeblood of the industry. they set the new standards and the trends, and they have the wildest ideas and most interesting stories. and they're usually the best of the pictures in the country. you're not mr. purple. some other guy is mr. purple. you're mr. pink. these independent directors have their own vision and they want to create a movie that reflects their vision. that's the most important thing. (julie dash) i think we're all a little bit crazy. i think all of us have been traumatized by somet
LINKTV
Nov 8, 2012 11:00am PST
annenberg media ♪ captioning sponsored by annenberg/cpb narrator: in the region of latin america, a key geographical issue isopulation-- its distributionand rad. inub-region ofexico, weo oklation movement, or migration bo within mexico and north tohe u. we explore a major and unexpectedource of migras caedollow re weskf e usionof s can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintendeconsequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. often, those hopes are arrested manyre at the border.o man: ahora lista po la mano frente... narrator the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entrywith hid: it was the migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr richard jones to the i.n. with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that economic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation
LINKTV
Nov 29, 2012 7:30am PST
not date. in mexico they don't either. but this is america. you just have to get the word out. let the women know you are available. maybe jamal can make me a sign. what's the problem, victor ? you're pacing back and forth like an expectant father. look at this place. it's like a morgue. 12:30. why aren't there more people here ? maybe it's the cooking. maybe it's the service. could i have another cup of coffee, please ? sure. lately that guy spends more time here than i do. - hello again. - more coffee ? actually, i'd like a glass of water. the coffee's a little hot. i was going to add some ice cubes. - why don't i give you a glass of ice ? - great. there you go. you're all set. you've got your coffee, your cream, your sugar and your ice. - oh, there is one more thing. - yes ? i'd like to know your name. - my name ? - yeah. i mean, since you are my waitress i'd like to be able to call you by your name you know, instead of miss or ma'am or hey, you. - i'm katherine. - my name's bill. - it's nice to meet you. - nice to meet you too. excuse me. - say, "che
LINKTV
Nov 9, 2012 4:00pm PST
got arrested for selling 2 live crew albums. in america today, the flame of censorship is once again burning brightly. it was important to founders of rock the vote for young people to have a voice in this debate that was going on. it became immediately clear that voting had to be a part of how you could use your voice. and so rock the vote immediately began registering young people to vote because to even be able to participate in the process, you first have to register. ♪ hey [ scat singing ] poussaint: from the start, rock the vote was able to build momentum by enlisting celebrities and partnering with youth-oriented media such as mtv. ♪ truth is where you find it ♪ get up and vote celebrities are basically a tool to educate young people about rock the vote. you got the right to vote. speak your mind and vote. so that young people listen. poussaint: and it appears that in 1992, young people did listen. it was a presidential election year -- republican george bush sr. versus democrat bill clinton. after the ballots were counted, rock the vote claimed a victory of its own. we
LINKTV
Oct 31, 2012 7:30pm PDT
've looked here at a little bit of islam in america, and so that we can get some of these remarkable roll-in footages that we had over in israel here- i want to bring those in- let me move first to our first roll-in and look at islam in israel. you know, you would imagine there'd be some tension there, but there's a very vital and viable community there. we had an opportunity to go to the dome of the rock, and the al- aqsa mosque, and this is just a very short piece because it took forever to try to get in there with the cameras- they were not going to let us in. and to add to the tension, as we were trying to get in through the doorway to get into the arab or the muslim area, i should say, they hauled out a young jewish fellow who had tried to pray there. i think he was praying that somehow the temple would fall and so that the jewish temple could be rebuilt. i'm not really sure, but he'd obviously been beaten, and so, you know- machine guns, the whole thing; nobody firing them, but the tension is palpable over there. nevertheless, after- thanks to our good arab guide, we were able to ge
LINKTV
Nov 2, 2012 3:00pm PDT
. lasos. >> this is not just a problem for san francisco. it's a problem for america. america is losing the jobs oversees and the corporations are taking the jobs oversees and off shoring the labor and my proposal is tax those corporations that off shore our jobs. just tax them and that will be a deterrent and we can use that money to create jobs here at home here in san francisco. use that money to create jobs in the private and public sector so that's my proposal to create jobs in san francisco. >> mr. rogers. >> i like that one. you know i think that the gross revenue tax is a progressive tax and that tax would allow new businesses, small businesses able to flourish so we have something to look forward to with that. that being said treasure island seems to me a car dependent project and unless you have a ferry that is going there and dropping you off, but that would be somewhat time consuming. the same is true with hunter's point and the problem is there isn't a lot of transportation near there. the trances bay terminal next to bart, next to cal train this is a great project and
LINKTV
Nov 29, 2012 7:30pm PST
questions about new directions for religion in america. one of the important goals of believes and believers is, for students to develop an appreciation for religious diversity. we're very fortunate today to have professor keith naylor, who is a professor of religious studies at occidental college in los angeles. keith, we're seeing in society a further gap in terms of the haves and have-nots, sort of a socio-economic gap. is this going to affect the organization of religions or are we going to see religions further splitting according to who has wealth and who doesn't in our society? >> well, i think we've already seen some of that in some places. but, being in los angeles i am seeing a different kind of model where, and i think this is the value of living a major urban centre-- where churches are and other religious groups are really seeing their mandate as closing that divide and bringing people together and building bridges across the class line that seems to be widening. again, some of my students have gone out to what would seem to be suburban type religious institutions, who could be
LINKTV
Nov 13, 2012 9:00am PST
chinese, that's why i did religion in america, so i can get out of grad school sooner. people who took the east asian religions are still searching out their phds as they struggle with this language. so forgive me but basic terminology that we see drawn out of the tradition of chi- material energy, li- the principle of spiritual energy and together the two combined to be the essence of everything that exists. so, inside me, inside the table, inside everything that's in this room, that's going on, that kind of balance here. mythic; two names it's a vast panorama of scholars, and princes, and kings, and dynasties as you may well know but the two key names that come up in the mythic dimension; in other words the great leaders, if we must have leaders. confucius of course; the great scholar, drawn from his name becomes confucianism and lao tzu the mysterious. some say he didn't even exist; we're not sure when he existed but the composite leader-- and we will have an expert thank goodness on here because i am certainly not one. dr glenn shive will be with us to help us sort through some que
LINKTV
Nov 1, 2012 7:30am PDT
guests are from south america. and my translator cancelled out at the last minute so i-- i thought of you. i don't know if i would be the right person. well, of course you would. you speak spanish. you've learned a lot about business, and you're obviously familiar with restaurants. come on, rosa. you'll do fine. can i get extra credit ? that's very funny. well, here is the address. seven o'clock, okay ? sure. see you tonight. yes. maybe we could visit your accountant together. my schedule's a little busy right now. my son's coming home from school next week, so i'm trying to plan a few things. oh, you mean like going camping or maybe a ball game ? he's not really the athletic type. actually, he's writing a paper on how to run a small business. so he'll probably spend most of his time in the library. you should bring him by to visit crossroads cafe. what do you mean ? well, we are a small business. and it would be a pleasure to help your son with his project. that's very kind of you, mr. brashov. he could see how do things and ask questions. it would be
LINKTV
Nov 8, 2012 7:30pm PST
in africa and other places, south america. what happens, though, is with lots of complex pressures- the holocaust, the end of world war ii, political struggles all over the world, and struggles on the part of the people already in israel, the jews- well, we get a state in 1948. now the struggle continues. i love dr. lorberbaum's word- "well, the argument continues." well, you know, there's a lot of bullets and blood and bombs flying through this argument. but what we experienced, to whisk it up to the present- we had the '67 war, you know, the war in the early '70s- to whisk it into the present, what we find is it comes down to human beings. many jews we met who obviously have the power, and from the muslim perspective, are seen as being supported and propped up by the united states, which makes us part of the enemy in that thing. but nevertheless, many jews like lorberbaum are very open to dialogue, and even what he said is extremely controversial- coming out in favor of partitioning of the land. but what you see on a day-to-day basis- and we experienced this; we walked around wit
LINKTV
Nov 15, 2012 11:00am PST
annenberg media ♪ captioning sponsored enberg/cpb narrator: since 19, latin america has been one of e most rapidly urbanizing regions on eart nowhere are the sults more dramatic than in sao paulo, brazil, the third largest city in the world. in this anatomy of a mega-city, we'll explore: the urban geography of immigration and ethnic diversity, thsquatter settlements and self-construction. sao paulo, brazil. with its crowded boulevards and massive skyscrapers, it seems awealthy as any city in the world. sao paulo is unique among latin american cities. in the early part of t, when places like rio de janeiro copied traditional european styles of construction, sao paulo was following a distinctly american model of urbanism. imitating the forms of chicago and new york, sao paulo built upward,gro. but in a huge ring around ty slies a very different,gro. urban environment. here, stretchingoriles, is a city of self-built structures in various stages of completion. they line hillsides and rocky streets where some of sao paulo's newest immigrants struggo build mes om brick and cen where s
LINKTV
Nov 15, 2012 6:30pm PST
did that. and i was gonna retire as soon as i won the flyweight championship of north america, but i never got that far. i got up to the silver medal for the aau in new england at the age of 17. and that was about it. after that, in the follow-up fight, getting ready for the nationals, i got knocked out, the end of that career. another big influence on my life was burl grey, a sign painter that i met back in the late fifties. burl was painting in miami and i was assigned to paint with him. no one else would paint with him because there was a rumor going around about him that he was, yeah, one of them. he was accused of being, and i found out for myself that old burl was an intellectual. and intellectuals didn't cut it at the sign painting circuit. anyway, burl grey influenced me a lot. he's the one that lit my fire to get into science. and many of the ideas i had about things were-- burl sort of demolished. he was a very philosophical type and he was a nontheist. and he, you know, convinced me that things were so much simpler if you took a more scientific view of the world and there'
LINKTV
Nov 9, 2012 3:00pm PST
: if the king is coming or if someone from america or france is coming, we are asked to go out and show our happiness, our appreciation that they come to see us. we go out, around a hundred of us, and we clap our hands and hit this piece of metal that we have. it is quite a show. you can really appreciate it. if the government needs the guild steward in some cases like that, they call him. that's the role of the guild steward. keach: archaeologists believe that in ancient ostia specialists also organized themselves into craft associations and guilds. the shipwrights, for example, had a large and active guild. these are the ruins of what is believed to have been their clubhouse. it was a magnificent building with a suite of dining rooms arranged around a long, indoor fish pond that would have been lined with imported marble. claridge: the principal feature is this large, central court which provides ample space for all sorts of perhaps alfresco dining as well that they could actually put their couches out in the garden and dine outside. otherwise, there would be entertainments laid on -- dan
LINKTV
Nov 12, 2012 8:00am PST
service to this country, but for reminding us why america is and always will be the greatest nation on earth. >> although president obama stressed the importance of supporting returning troops in his speech, veterans continue to face extremely high levels of the unemployment, traumatic brain injury, ptsd, and homelessness. their unemployment rate is 3% higher than the general population. almost a quarter of recent veterans coming home are injured physically or emotionally. more than 600,000 veterans are homeless, an estimated 18 veterans commit suicide a day. a new study questions the government's commitment to supporting soldiers. and the headline "accuracy isn't priority as va battles disability claims backlog" reveals how thousands of veterans are being denied disability benefits as a result of errors. in his article, he writes about navy veteran hosea roundtree, whose claim for disability compensation was reduced, despite in suffering from flashbacks from his time in lebanon. the va has a duty to assist veterans in developing their evidence to support the claims, but the departm
LINKTV
Nov 14, 2012 9:00am PST
's most beautiful lakes were gouged out of hard rock by glaciers, including north america's great lakes and the famous lochs of scotland. even the great expanses of rich agricultural soils that blanket china and the soviet union, canada and the united states owe their existence to glaciers. moving glacial ice pulverizes the underlying rock into silt-sized fragments. this silt was eventually transported and concentrated by the wind into the vast fertile soils of today. early scientists didn't really appreciate the important geological role of glaciers. even geologists were convinced that glaciers had never existed outside of their present locations over the last one million years. a breakthrough came in 1836 when swiss scientist louis agassiz reported evidence that the inhabitants of medieval villages in europe had moved their towns to keep pace with advancing glaciers. further study revealed that glaciers leave behind a distinctive deposit of sediment, like these boulders, as they melt back and retreat. geologically-recent examples of these sedimentary deposits, found hundreds of kilome
LINKTV
Nov 16, 2012 3:00pm PST
languages still spoken in central america. over the centuries, the words have changed, but still they echo the past. the maya have not used hieroglyphs since the sixteenth century, when spanish bishop landa made his observations of life in the yucatan. at that time, landa recorded what he called a mayan a-b-c. but this alphabet didn't make sense until scholars realized that landa had misunderstood just how the maya wrote. linda schele deciphers mayan texts. the maya used two kinds of signs to spell things. one is called a logograph because it represents a whole word. the other is a phonetic sign that represents a syllable. for instance, if they wanted to spell the word "jaguar," they could just use a picture of the animal. the word for "jaguar" in maya is "balam," okay ? now any maya who saw the jaguar head is going to say "balam," just like you're an english speaker, you see the jaguar, you'd say "jaguar." but there is more than one cat. so they could draw their jaguar head... and they could put a sign in front of it that tells you how to pronounce the first part of the word as "ba." this
LINKTV
Nov 16, 2012 4:00pm PST
can make them see our point of view. some of america's most effective interest groups are local grassroots organizations dedicated to a single cause, and when the issue is resolved, they generally disappear. lacking financial resources and permanent organizations, these groups must depend on mobilizing people to write letters, make phone calls, lobby officials, and sometimes to demonstrate, all in pursuit of their cause. man: caltrans used to tell you that the freeways weren't unhealthy. well, now you see them putting the barrier walls and schools can't be located next to freeways anymore -- the health concerns. man: the fact of the matter is that by letting caltrans run amok over the last, you know, six decades or so, we ended up with twice as much of the l.a. county paved over as the average metropolitan area. [ bagpipes play ] poussaint: south pasadena, california, is a city of 23,000 people nestled in the vastness of los angeles county. woman: as far as south pasadena, we like to think of it as 10 minutes and 100 years from los angeles. poussaint: the city is renowned for it
LINKTV
Nov 21, 2012 8:00am PST
walmart a black eye? >> because we live in america and we work for the world's largest company and we're still not making it. >> because after choosing between paying my bills -- >> because i'm 52 years old and i cannot afford my own apartment on what i make a walmart. >> walmart workers across the country planning to stage unprecedented walkouts and protests on friday, the busiest shopping day of the year. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. violence continues to flare in the israeli assault on the gaza strip as a cease-fire remains out of reach. and breaking news, about 21 people have been wounded in a bus bombing near military headquarters in the israeli city of tel aviv. israeli police say two suspects threw a bomb on to the bus before fleeing the scene. the attack marks one of the worst inside israel and several years. tuesday saw an unrelenting wave of israeli strikes on the gaza strip, with the palestinian toll climbing to over 139 dead and more than 1000 wounded. palestinian rocket fire also con
LINKTV
Nov 30, 2012 3:00pm PST
america to the nuer of east africa to the chinese. but why did the lineage members at teotihuacan live together in a single household ? in a laboratory at teotihuacan, dolph widmer measures potsherds thousands of years old. his team collected more than a million of these at tlajinga. measuring the fragments, widmer discovers a remarkable similarity in size. looking for explanations, he examined the methods of modern potters. here, within the outskirts of the ancient city, in the neighborhood of san sebastian, a handful of potters still use ancient techniques. man: bueno, este viene siendo de... interpreter: i learned how to do pottery from my grandparents and from my great-grandparents. i watched how they worked. i started when i was very small. keach: oliverio hernandez-resendiz is one of the few remaining potters in san sebastian. he makes large pots that are used primarily for cooking. resendiz works with molds, enabling him to work quickly, while keeping the size and shape of the pots consistent. the use of molds explains why the remains found in tlajinga were so uniform. widmer: i
LINKTV
Nov 6, 2012 9:00am PST
with others- you must feel with others- far from where we live in america. we are all brothers, and we have to feel with each other, and we feel very much with these people who will know no peace. not one single day passes without trouble in these areas. and i think being a christian, i cannot side with an oppressor. >> let's get to the point. this behavior- in a good behavior, in good conduct, to keep in touch with others is our challenge all the time to build a new world, a new, nice village, to live together in peace and harmony and love for each others. we aren't satisfied on what happened all the time. i am 68 years old. i have not seen even one good day in my life. i'm struggling always day and night. searching for a good day. >> that was one of the most poignant interviews- >> i was just going to say, that was a tearjerker. >> oh, i- let me tell you about mr. fahoum. he was so polite and had us in and we had a whole lot of caffeine and a whole lot of sugar. but nevertheless, we had gone through an interview, and you know, it was rather perfunctory and we were getting some stuff down,
LINKTV
Nov 2, 2012 11:00am PDT
and national leaders to try to solve the problem of homelessness in america. one thing we do at the booker t. washington center to where i was recently president, building affordable housing half of had which will be dedicated to emancipated youth. so i think we really do need to look at the root cause of the issue. it's about inequity and how we provide supportive housing and mental health services and drug treatment and really look at the problem from its source. thank you. >> thank you. davis, miss olague and miss selby. >> currently any member of public can review a project. critics say this results in costs and limiting supply of housing. opponents say discretionary review is necessary so that everyone affected by a project can be heard. how would you if the all reform the discretionary process? mr. davis, miss olague and miss selby. >> as a board president of booker t. recently we had to seek permission from the board of supervisors for housing and community space. , as much as i would have liked that process to go quicker, as much as i would have liked to see less opposition from so
LINKTV
Nov 2, 2012 11:30am PDT
in america. and we do need government to start taking leadership around the issue. regardless of the merits of this particular proposal, one thing i want to bring to city hall is a locally sourced healthy food insurance. santa clara county recently band all vending machines from their county facilities and i think we can lead by example, whether it's city hall, hospitals or our schools we should insist on healthy foods and healthy food choices and teaching our children how to grow their own food and cooking. so i would like to see an increase in community garden and an increase in the city with leadership around this issue. >> mr. everest is this your third or fourth use of the time card? >> i know i am out of these. [ laughter ] well, if we finish early i will come back to you. >> all right. >> now a question for miss breed and mr. resignato. san francisco currently provides free or low-cost health care to residents who can't afford private health insurance and do not qualify for coverage from the state or federal government? do you agree with funding this for employees who spend less
LINKTV
Nov 7, 2012 7:30pm PST
is not followed through, then as alexis de toteville said- the great student of democracy in america- the likelihood is this country will either be moved to anarchy or authoritarian rule. so the short answer to your question is, yes, i think that lawyers play an indispensable role with this model of legal practice toward the harmonizing and reconciling of diversity in this country, and the continued prosperity of the american experiment. >> grisham, right down the line. >> what we're seeing here is he's a lawyer, but i think what he's speaking about is a problem in terms of the ethical dimension and the social dimension that this particular country's facing, and that is diversity. you mentioned that that particular airline said, "i don't like diversity." well, unfortunately, folks, if you live in this particular country, you're going to see more and more diversity. and i think what harrison shepherd is saying is that all the professions have to begin to find ways of overcoming these differences. to put it in our religious terms and our ethical terms, we can no longer rely on separate
LINKTV
Nov 20, 2012 7:30pm PST
about and it's almost a common language amongst, certainly people in america. i guess what i'm curious about is i want to ask james why do you think that executives are uncomfortable with more personal things and they prefer things that seem to be referential to other films-- because they'll do better? because they simply fit into something they've already done, so they feel...? despite presenting themselves as risk takers most executives in hollywood are quite the contrary. they are people allergic to risk. whit, you haven't had that much experience in hollywood itself but to what extent have you used it as a model to define yourself if necessarily against or next to...? i really see it more in story terms and script terms. when i was reading books, trying to figure out how to write my first screenplay there's a huge resistance to the dogmatism and this sort of particularity of the books but actually the more i watch and the more i work in films i think that these books have a lot of truth for the kind of film they want to make. so i think that more and more this kind of formulaic scr
LINKTV
Nov 28, 2012 7:30pm PST
in america who are jewish, who have made the choice to move to israel for that very reason to maintain that faith. and of course one of the real tragedies within the more liberal or the reformed jewish families is the tendency for the jewish son or daughter to marry someone outside of the faith. and that's - it's very tragic and it's one reason why people have moved to a more enclosed setting. so you know here we are back to that dynamics of the social settings. it's much easier to maintain or deal with those dilemmas of institutionalization if there is less diversity. in fact, they say if the pond is kind of static you just have a few players, it's easier to maintain the structures. but that takes us back to the theme of the previous class, which is hey in the united states if we are looking at this social environment, if anything those factors are going to contribute to more and more diversity. so it's a real, real difficult question, how we relate to new religious movements? how, labeling is not the term i am really looking for but how we understand them in relationship to other peo
LINKTV
Nov 7, 2012 9:00am PST
in the united states, the gobi desert in central asia. western south america has a similar situation. we have a chain of mountains down the west coast-- the andes-- which serve as a barrier forming this rain shadow. another factor that plays an indirect role in the formation of deserts is plate tectonics. the position of the continents in the polar regions or the equatorial regions or the subtropical regions, of course, is a function of plate tectonics. as an example, africa, 250 million years ago, in permian times, was much farther south, near the south pole. what we call the kalahari desert now was glaciated at that time. that wasn't long ago. that was only about 5% of geologic time. in the southwestern united states, too, there is evidence of a once widespread desert that existed 200 million years ago. fossil dunes are preserved in the upper wall of the grand canyon and in the sandstones of zion national park. the varied surfaces of the shifting sand dunes appear as crisscrossing sets of beds. their large size and coloration from the oxidation of iron show that they formed on dry land. sin
LINKTV
Nov 14, 2012 8:00am PST
second, than you get out of all the power plants in north america, counting canada? 10 liters of water per second. i mean the poorest nation in the world can muster up 10 waters of liter-- 10 liters of water per second. that's sea water, any kind of water. if you could fuse the hydrogen in there, hmm, you talk about big energy, gang. enormous energy. you're gonna--all this stuff about oil and whale oil. i mean, already we've forgotten about whale oil, right? when you guys-- you grew up burning whale oil? no--petroleum, right? what did your great grandfathers--whale oil. the world's changing. now, when we get up to, where we can harness this kind of thing. hmm--different, different. 'cause the fuel is the most abundant element in the universe hydrogen. over 90% of the universe estimated to be hydrogen. the universe, gang, as far as a human condition, is the same design for where we are now, where we would've been, or where we're going? it's all fusion fuel out there, gang. now, we haven't been able to do that now because it's very difficult to do. it was difficult to make airplanes fly
LINKTV
Nov 27, 2012 8:00am PST
times? like, you can talk about traveling to south america, you can talk about traveling to the mainland. you can talk about traveling to europe, but can you go to the travel agent today and talk about traveling into time? we got new years coming up. we got a big one pretty soon, 2000, the year 2000, okay? and then 2001, 21st century, yeah? how about someone says, well, i'm not so much interested in that. i'm kind of a futurist. most of my friends are sort of like historians. they study history, where we've been. and it's kind of a real gas to know where we've been and where we are now. but my bit is where are we going? that's what i'm interested in. and what i'd like to do is i'd like to travel to the 25th century. and i'd like to see what human beings are doing for new year's eve in the year 2500, okay? what's it gonna be like then? now you go to your travel agent now and ask, you know what they're gonna say to you? the same thing they would have said to you a century ago if you told them you wanted to go from one part to the other part of the world in a metal airplane. they'd say, com
LINKTV
Nov 5, 2012 9:00am PST
in america- the likelihood is this country will either be moved to anarchy or authoritarian rule. so the short answer to your question is, yes, i think that lawyers play an indispensable role with this model of legal practice toward the harmonizing and reconciling of diversity in this country, and the continued prosperity of the american experiment. >> grisham, right down the line. >> what we're seeing here is he's a lawyer, but i think what he's speaking about is a problem in terms of the ethical dimension and the social dimension that this particular country's facing, and that is diversity. you mentioned that that particular airline said, "i don't like diversity." well, unfortunately, folks, if you live in this particular country, you're going to see more and more diversity. and i think what harrison shepherd is saying is that all the professions have to begin to find ways of overcoming these differences. to put it in our religious terms and our ethical terms, we can no longer rely on separate or disparate definitions of proper patterns of action- we have to begin to see, in a broa
LINKTV
Nov 29, 2012 3:00pm PST
to a grocery store, and i show them all the different cereals, and say, we want toave oicen america. thta and i show them all inus.ifferent cereals, it doesn't seem to give us better health re, it doesn't seem to give us lower costs, but it does give us choice, and we value choice above everything. from a practical point of view, the first decision many consumers are confronted with is how to finance their health care. the choices are simply to pay for it themselves, or to enroll in a private or public health insurance plan. a lot is said about the marketplace of health care. well, for half of people who are getting their health plan through an employer, their employer offers such a narrow range of plans that they-- the consumer-- feel that they are cut off from options they really would like to have. many employers only offer plans that require a patient co-pay or less expensive hmos. cost-sharing makes the assumption that the person can identify what's an appropriate and inappropriate service. and so you go to the doctor, and you're looking for help, and you have to pay maybe 20% of the docto
LINKTV
Nov 13, 2012 4:00pm PST
the information she was sent to find. ¿son cartas de rosario? sí. this information leads raquel to south america to buenos aires, capital of argentina. in the cosmopolitan melting pot of buenos aires... raquel makes a surprising discovery-- one that alters her investigation completely. ¿su hermano? sí. with new information in hand raquel sets off in a different direction... and another letter comes into her possession. it is this letter which takes raquel to another place as she continues her search... to the sun-drenched island of puerto rico, in the caribbean. in san juan, raquel meets a young woman who will play an important role in her investigation. ¿qué hace usted aquí? together they discover another piece of the past hidden away in a sailor's trunk. este era el baúl de mi padre. finally, the trail leads back to mexico. in the highlands outside mexico city raquel faces a crisis that threatens the life of a young man. she does not know if she will get back to see don fernando before it is too late. roberto... iroberto! captioning of this program is made possible by the annenberg/cpb p
LINKTV
Nov 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
and $20 loaned from his father. his long journey eventually took him to america, where he knew he had found the location to fulfill his dreams. >> when i come visit in california, 1966, i say, "that's the place i'm gonna stay and i die." i love california. >> that love shows in the vineyards, where gus and his son look over the literal fruits of their labor. and not too far away are the makings of their next vintage. from their home in lodi, they have made many friends, who help them do something important in greek culture, celebrate. >> all right, my friends, some relatives, friends, all of us come this country with about-- with nothing. so god help us. all of us have been working hard and doing things. today for me is the big day in celebrate the stama wine. it bring back the name where i come from. >> family, i feel, is the most important thing. without family, you really don't have anything at all. working with my father, i must say that i've been raised as an only child, no brothers, no sisters. my father not only is my friend, but he's my brother, too, and my father. and everyth
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